Bodhisattwa and the Making of a Handcarved Polyptych (part 2)

October 12, 2008

It’s time for the second part of this story about the Bodhisattwa polyptych or paravent. I want to show you the details of this work so that you can clearly see how filigrane the work is. Please don’t forget to click on the images – they are much larger than you can see here.

This polyptych can be used as a paravent of course, meant to close off part of a room. But it can be used as a wall basrelief also and mounted on a wall which might be recommendable just for security reasons. The fragile work will break easily if it topples over to the floor.

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I can confirm that this piece of artwork does change the aura of a room and interiror designers may pay attention to this jewel. It’s not that I want to praise myself here but I am simply proud of this work and I think you can see this.

Imagine – this is not made from illegally cut tropical wood which people unfortunately continue to boast of and which makes me really sick because the rainforests of this planet are the precious heritage of all mankind. No – it is made from regular, damn common pine wood boards which are grown as a renewable resource. The magnificent and precious tropical woods are not.

This piece of artwork proves that you can transform common material into something precious and exotic and very special and beautiful also. It takes a lot of work and patience to do this and quite a big portion of commitment because it is not a quick task to finish this work. But you can see it is doable. I love doing this kind of work. It gives you a lot of satisfaction and happiness.

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Additionally this artwork will never experience any cracks due to climate changes, heat or dryness of a room. Objects made from tropical woods will sooner or later have cracks in our northern climates which is really not the nicest thing to happen to an expensive piece of furniture nor art. The common argument of vendors that this would be normal is not acceptable in my opinion.

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The entire work is an original design. It began with detailed drawings which were transferred to the wood. The open wood work was sawn with an electric handsaw. After that the motifs were handcarved.

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Each of the panels is one piece of wooden board. Only the thin frame was added when the whole sawing and carving work was done. The frame was added as a kind of stabiliser to the fragile carving work and as means to connect the panels with hinges. These hinges are door hinges not the regular hinges that are used for paravents. The latter were too plump for this kind of work – so I used door hinges. Thus all the panels can be separated from each other and used as separate decoration pieces if needed. Due to the three separate feet the 3 middle panels can stand freely on their own.

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(will be continued…)

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